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About Francesca Mandolini

Francesca es licenciada en Ciencias de la Comunicación en la Universitá degi Studi di Macerata (Italia) y está especializada en marketing online. El italiano es su lengua materna, y domina tanto la lengua inglesa como el español.

Benedetto Vigna: the inventor behind the Wii console 3D motion sensor

A lots of inventions, directly or indirectly, deeply change everyday lives of most of the population of the World.

Today MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems), for example, are everywhere: who ever got simply a mobile phone, a game console or a simple washing machine, uses them without even knowing they exist.

The man who brought this technology to main consumer goods, pioneer in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), is the Italian engineer and inventor Benedetto Vigna.

Before to continue, let’s clarify: what the MEMS are?

Basically, they are systems that integrate sensors with microchips: the first capture information, the other process it, making decisions and giving orders to implement the appropriate actions. A typical application of MEMS were airbags.

In 1995, Benedetto Vigna started to work for STMicroelectronics, one of Europe’s leading electronics and semiconductor manufacturers, where he started to work on a great innovation: not only miniaturize the MEMS to a scale never seen before, but create a completely new type, with the third dimension and therefore able to interpret the movements of the real world.

The result was a great invention: a highly successful 3D motion-control-sensor, heart of the Wii console from Japanese company Nintendo.

Oktoberfest and patents

The legendary Munich’s annual Oktoberfest is approaching: an outstanding event able to bring over 6 million visitors in just a couple of weeks.

Since we are always looking for links between IP and the most various fields, it may be interesting to talk about an aspect that hardly anybody knows, that is the relation between Oktoberfest and patents and the pioneering role that this celebration plays in new technology.

So, for our “Patents world” section this week we took inspiration from this very interesting and amusing video developed by the EPO (European Patent Office):

By |12 de September, 2014|0 Comments

Trademark registration of Ice Bucket Challenge

Last week the protagonist on social media has been, no doubt, the campaign called “Ice bucket challenge”: the viral iced shower campaign created for charity with the intention to raise fund for research and fight against the degenerative neurological disease ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis).

The Ice Bucket Challenge is an idea of Pete Frates, promise of baseball and ALS sufferer; the American Association (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association) developed the idea and turn it into a viral social campaign which has raised in the US over $60 million from the donation of people who has poured a bucket of iced water over their heads.

Now it seems that part of this money will possibly be used by the association for the trademark registration of “Ice bucket challenge” phrase.

According to the USPTO database, the ALS association applied last August to register both “Ice Bucket Challenge” 86375292 and “ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” 86375305 as trademarks; in the application, it is specified that the use of such trademark will be for charitable fundraising.

By |1 de September, 2014|0 Comments

Google and the “Glass” trademark registration trouble

One of the most debated news of the week regarding intellectual property and big companies is that the king of search engines, Google, is trying to register as a trademark the word “Glass”, in order to protect its wearable computer solution. After obtaining the registration of “Google Glass” as a trademark, a few months ago the company files an application for the world “Glass”.Google_Glass_

As it had to be expected, the Mountain View group is having some trouble to obtain the registration of the word “Glass” as a trademark and facing quite a lot of criticisms.

In fact, the USPTO (United States Patent and Trademark Office) has objected to the application declaring that “glass” is merely descriptive (therefore lacking one of the main requirements for a word to be registered as a trademark) and also very similar to other software products, element that could induce consumers to confusion.